"Use your motivation to create a writing habit." - David Farland

Given that we've just started a new year, it seems fitting to talk about writing motivation. After all, most of us have probably set at least one new writing goal or resolution, right? But how are we going to stick with those goals (and should we)?

I want to share three great articles with you on the topic of writer motivation -- maybe to inspire you and maybe to rethink being hard on yourself if everything doesn't go according to plan.

Motivation vs. Habit

By David Farland at DavidFarland.net

In this post David Farland makes an excellent point -- motivation only has to take you so far. And rather than constantly seeking motivation, a better move might be to use the motivation we have when we have it to build better habits. After all, good writing habits will take us to places fleeting motivation never will.

Great insight and an inspiring way of looking at things.

Read the post.

You Get a Gold Star: Tracking and Motivation

By Steph Snow at BareKnuckleWriter.com

After reading this, I felt so less crazy for having not one, but two, packs of those shiny little star stickers in my desk drawer. You know. The ones your elementary school teachers probably stuck on your papers if you didn't completely suck at elementary school things.

In fact, I'm so crazy about reward-style motivation that I even have a chore chart (one clearly made for children -- young ones). And instead of those shiny little star stickers, it has the equivalent, but in magnet form. So I can keep re-using them. Oh, and the chore chart is on a whiteboard. #Heaven

I did get hubby to agree to let me create a chore chart for us (we both hate housework about 94% of the time). But he would only agree to an app variety. So no magnetic "stickers" for me. Just another reason I can't wait to have kids!

Read the post.

Crappy New Year: 5 Failed Writing Resolutions

By Peter Derk at LitReactor.com

If you've ever set a writing resolution that was a royal failure, you'll love this post. Derk takes a lighthearted look at some common writing goals, how they can go terribly wrong, and reminds us that it's okay to take a different approach if it suits us. Read it for the laugh, but take away an important message.

Read the post.

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